Smoke's bar and grill

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by HittingSmoke, Apr 10, 2017.

Smoke's bar and grill

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by HittingSmoke, Apr 10, 2017.

  1. HittingSmoke

    HittingSmoke AoA Emeritus

    Flanken rib protip: Never buy them in the package from the meat department. Always ask for fresh cut. Specifying a thickness will give you a good reason since they're usually cut very thin. When they're packaging them they stuff shitty ribs with hardly any meat hidden behind nice wide cuts. When you ask for a fresh cut the butcher is going to be much more inclined to give you nice, big, uniform sections of beef so you don't complain.

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  2. HittingSmoke

    HittingSmoke AoA Emeritus

    I really love cowboy rubs (common sold by heathens labeled as "steak rub") on beef roasts but the ones sold in stores are often overly salty and not that great. So I designed my own cowboy rub recipe.

    • Chili powder made from fresh-ground chilis and toasted cumin courtesy of Alton Brown
    • Dried, minced garlic
    • Coffee grounds
    • Dried, minced onion
    • Cracked black pepper
    • Toasted, fresh-ground coriander
    • Fresh-ground black mustard seed
    • Unsweetened cocoa powder
    • Cayenne pepper
    • Fresh-ground cloves
    • Fresh-ground cinnamon
    The homemade chili powder is critical. I also use it in my taco seasoning. It's got so much more flavor than the bland bullshit that you get from a grocery store. It's a lot of work to make, but totally worth it. Just make it in big batches in a food processor.

    The first run of the rub turned out great on a test cook with short ribs. It's only suitable for long cooks as the large chunks of peppercorns and coffee beans need to soften up and absorb fat or it's like eating sand. When cooked fully it comes out as a crispy crust like deep fried bread crumbs. A great byproduct of this rub is the best beef drippings you'll ever taste. Put in on a roast over a drip pan or in the slow cooker and it creates concentrated au jus that's amazing for french dips.

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  3. Fell

    Fell Guild Admin Staff Member

    Damn that looks good. I've been experimenting with Beef ribs and dry rubs with mostly "over the counter" dry ingredients, some are pretty complicated. It's tasty but likely not as rich as what's in that pic. Also, beef ribs are so inconvenient to eat...big bones little meaty morsels
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  4. HittingSmoke

    HittingSmoke AoA Emeritus

    Beef back ribs from a grocery store are a ripoff. The problem is, back ribs are right up against the ribeye, one of the most valuable cuts of beef. So when they cut boneless ribeyes, they get as much meat off the ribs as possible to maximize the size of the steaks. When you buy beef back ribs, you're basically getting scraps from boneless steaks.

    There are several options:

    1. Buy a whole bone-in rib primal and cut it up yourself. You can get them at Costco. It's going to cost you at least around $150. More if you opt for USDA prime. Then you can trim off the ribs leaving as much meat as you like, and you'll have delicious ribeye steaks or roasts left over for a fraction of what you'd pay per pound if you bought them individually. This is what I do because it's economical and I have two good sources for beef primals.
    2. Go to a real butcher and ask for a cut of back ribs with plenty of meat left behind. You're going to pay a premium because they're giving up valuable meat that could be sold as ribeye, but you don't have to cut the thing up yourself.
    3. Combine 1 and 2. Go to a butcher and ask for a rib primal custom cut. Ask for plenty of meat to be left on the ribs, with whatever combination of roast and/or steaks you want made from the rest. This way there's little waste and you get a pile of meat at a discount price because you're buying a whole primal. Just throw what you can't eat immediately in the freezer and you have several weeks (or days, in my case) of high quality beef to eat.
    4. Buy plate ribs instead. This is where short ribs come from (pictured above) and they have a ton of meat with minimal bone because they're much lower on the ribcage than back ribs. Most short ribs sold in stores are the really small 2" shorties like you see above but you can order them cut much longer, up to over 6". They're much more per pound than back ribs but you're paying for mostly meat instead of mostly bone.
    4 is obviously the easiest and plate ribs are delicious and meaty. The best chilis and beef stews are made from braised plate ribs.
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  5. Fell

    Fell Guild Admin Staff Member

    Awesome tips and I love beef ribs. sounds like 3 or 4 will work for me,
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  6. HittingSmoke

    HittingSmoke AoA Emeritus

    If you've never tried it, braise short ribs in tomato sauce and herbs for a stew or chili. Coat them lightly in flour, sear in hot oil on all sides, then put them in a dutch oven barely covered in tomato sauce and herbs for around three hours or so. Let them chill overnight in the fridge then cut the meat off the bones. You can also take this opportunity to remove any excess fat if you have hangups about that. The meat should still feel pretty tough. Use the sauce they cooked in as a base for a chili or stew and add back in the meat. This will kick the shit out of any stew or chili made with "Beef stew meat" you buy in the grocery store consisting of the cheapest garbage at the bottom of the cow.
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  7. HittingSmoke

    HittingSmoke AoA Emeritus

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  8. HittingSmoke

    HittingSmoke AoA Emeritus

    Been on a bit of a cooking binge lately. I was so into eating this that I didn't get a photo. This is the wife's not-so-well-lit picture.

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    Halibut, lightly seasoned and pan seared. Steelhead, panko lemon pepper seasoned and pan seared. Broccolini and asparagus. I also did smoked salmon but it didn't turn out fantastically. It was way too lean.

    That halibut was amazing.
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  9. Fell

    Fell Guild Admin Staff Member

    I need to clear more time for cooking, that's awesome!
  10. HittingSmoke

    HittingSmoke AoA Emeritus

    I got super lucky. Was at a market and there was halibut for only $19/lb. It's usually $25+ so I was suspicious of the freshness. Took a risk on it and it turned out to be very fresh.
  11. Fell

    Fell Guild Admin Staff Member

    I'm in Sacramento, too far from the ocean or any major rivers to feel unduly confident in the available seafood. We have one supposedly great fish market in the area (I spent 15 years in San Fran, so my seafood standards tend to run high) but it's in a somewhat inconvenient spot and I haven't tried it yet. Inspiration...
  12. HittingSmoke

    HittingSmoke AoA Emeritus

    Having higher standards for your fresh fish just means you know the difference. That puts you ahead of 99% of people in seafood knowledge. Most people I've met who say they don't like seafood associate seafood with the smell of old fish.

    I've never done it, but I hear there are websites that ship very fresh frozen fish (no that's not an oxymoron) packed in dry ice. If you can't get good fish at a local market, that's toyo best bet.
  13. Fell

    Fell Guild Admin Staff Member

    I’ve bought smoked fish mail order, not fresh. Might have to try sometime. There was a time where barbecue to me was buying about 2 lbs of fresh tuna or salmon or both and slicing off nice sashimi pieces with a cold lager. That’s how much I trusted my old fishmonger. Life’s too short for bad seafood haha
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  14. HittingSmoke

    HittingSmoke AoA Emeritus

    I guess I can call this a Sloppy Smoke. I was watching Binging With Babish and he was making this monstrosity of a sandwich from Nine Nine with chili, mac and cheese, and pizza. It reminded me I have smoked short rib chili in the fridge that needs eating, as well as some bottom round steaks. So I processed the steaks the same way I do for chicken fried, with a needle tenderizer and a meat hammer. Breaded them lightly and fried in just enough oil to cover the bottom of the pot. As soon as the steak browned well I covered it in chili, covered the pot, and simmered it for about two hours until the steak was about to fall apart then threw it on an onion bun.

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  15. HittingSmoke

    HittingSmoke AoA Emeritus

    I find the most erotic part of a cow is the brisket

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  16. Fell

    Fell Guild Admin Staff Member

    Is that a hittingsmoke cut brisket or as-is from the butcher/store. I never see red meat looking quite that beautiful, I'm just salivating over the beef barley stew I could make with a cut like that mmmm.... Actually maybe it's too pretty for something stew-like...
  17. HittingSmoke

    HittingSmoke AoA Emeritus

    That's cut myself from a small piece of a half brisket flat I bought. I trim off the entire fat cap, cube up the read meat, grind it, then I grind up the fat in a separate container. I mix in fat to the red meat until I get my desired ratio of red/white (around 70/30). Then I take the rest of the ground fat and put it into the top of a double boiler for around three hours until I turns into mush. Then I put it in a mesh sieve and press until I get out as much rendered liquid fat as possible. I use this for pan frying and other situations where a very strong and flavorful oil is useful. McDonalds use to fry their french fries in beef fat which gave them their very distinct flavor until a bunch of fucking vegans ruined it for everyone by complaining.

    Here's the ground fat cap:

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    Here's what the burger mix looks like once it's got a healthy amount of fat mixed in:

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    I like a lot of fat, and coarse ground. This gives you big steak-like chunks of burger. It's hard to keep it together when it's this coarsely ground but all the connective tissue in brisket creates a sort of binder that helps hold everything together.

    And here's the rendered beef fat (tallow):

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    It turns white and solid in the fridge. It looks just like solid coconut oil when it cools. You can get it even cleaner looking with cheese cloth but I don't really care about how it looks.
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  18. Arcfire

    Arcfire Guild Admin Staff Member

    Yes please.
  19. HittingSmoke

    HittingSmoke AoA Emeritus

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    I need to build a biltong cabinet.
  20. Fell

    Fell Guild Admin Staff Member

    Preparation? I presume the beef has been soaked/brined in vinegar but was it seasoned? Also, damn those are the biggest salt granules i've ever seen. How are they adhering to the meat? And where the bejeezus did you get a fancy to make biltong? pretty obscure interest.... i love beef jerkey this could be interesting to try sometime...

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